Backpack Weight, Again

I spent most of last week on our third backpacking trip to Grand Canyon. This was the first chance for me to check out some of the new gear I bought.

This started after my realization that my pack was a hefty 46 lbs before a trip in 2014, and getting it down to 36 last year.

This year, I was very happy that my “wet load”, i.e. all food and water, was 36 lbs again, for five days on the trail. Ian had a pack weight of 28 lbs, and so I went about finding the difference after this trip.

After getting off the trail, I went directly to the backcountry office and weighed my pack – 32 lbs. In our room at Maswik Lodge, I pulled almost a full 1.5 pound of trash out of the pack, which was trash both Ian and I generated, and some I picked up from the other guys. That took the pack weight down to about 31.5 lbs.

Here is what I weighed at the house:

Leftover food: 1.7 lb left, out of about 6 lbs taken. I need to eat all of my applesauce, that was the heaviest single item left over.

Clothing: 6.8 lbs. This was the single biggest amount of stuff in my pack. It was darned cold on this trip, I don’t think we got above freezing the entire five days. I also wore everything I carried in the mornings and evenings. I was warm, but the clothing was heavy. I will research to see if I can buy stuff that is just as warm, but lighter. I had these layers: bottoms were base layer, hiking pants, fleece sweatpants, and the bottoms of my Frog Togg rain suit; tops were base layer, a thin hiking shirt, a long-sleeve mock turtleneck, a thick hoodie, and a fleece lined rain jacket with a hood.

Lows on the trip were about 15F, highs near 32F.

I think I could have left the fleece lined rain jacket behind in favor of the Frog Togg top; that was have saved 1.2 lbs.

Tent:  2 lb.  Ian and I split my tent, my part was 2 lbs (maybe a bit less, the fly was still wet from the last day condensation when I weighed it).

Pad:  14 oz.  My new Sea to Summit inflatable pad was 14 oz, about what the far more bulky closed-cell pad weighs.

Bag:  4.1 lb.  I carried my new 5F Teton Sports bag, 4.1 lb (as opposed to my far more bulky Cabelas 0F bag at 4.8 lbs, or my 20F Teton bag at 2.5 lbs).

The lesson here is that the keep-you-warm stuff (clothing and sleeping bag) was really the weight driver for this trip. Ian carried less clothing and his 20F Teton bag (and was a bit colder). I think we could have even left the body of the tent behind, and just used the fly and poles method (no bugs or snakes to worry about), which would have had negligible impact from the thermal insulating standpoint, and would actually have given us more room.

We hike, we learn.

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